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Uruguayan Law Students Score High at International Law Moot Competition

The Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition involves law students from over 500 law schools in 88 countries

Posted: May 3, 2005

2005 Jessup Cup competitors posing in front of the United States Supreme Court, Washington DC.
2005 Jessup Cup competitors posing in front of the United States Supreme Court, Washington DC. (Photo by Ennio Rizzi)

U.S. Ambassador Martin J. Silverstein greets Uruguayan team members Maria Brignini, Ady Beitler, and Bernardo Amorin del Campo, along with Guillermo Rosati de Ojeda and Nicolas Etcheverry from the University of Montevideo. (U.S. Embassy photo by Vince Alongi)
U.S. Ambassador Martin J. Silverstein greets Uruguayan team members Maria Brignini, Ady Beitler, and Bernardo Amorin del Campo, along with Guillermo Rosati de Ojeda and Nicolas Etcheverry from the University of Montevideo. (Click here to enlarge this photo)

 Maria Brignini, Bernardo Amorin del Campo and Ady Beitler receiving the Ambassador's Certificate of Appreciation. With them: Nicolas Etcheverry, U.S. Embassy's PAO Linda Gonzalez, and Guillermo Rosati de Ojeda. (U.S. Embassy photo by Vince Alongi)
Maria Brignini, Bernardo Amorin del Campo and Ady Beitler receiving the Ambassador's Certificate of Appreciation. With them: Nicolas Etcheverry, U.S. Embassy's PAO Linda Gonzalez, and Guillermo Rosati de Ojeda.
(Click here to enlarge this photo)
 

The Jessup Cup, one of the oldest and most prestigious moot court competitions, is sponsored by the American Society of International Law, the International Law Students' Association (ILSA) and the Shearman & Sterling law firm. Law schools throughout the world participate in the Jessup Moot Court, preparing memorials (briefs) and arguing a hypothetical case before the International Court of Justice, the judicial arm of the United Nations. Students from 88 countries participate, with winners of regional rounds advancing to national rounds. National winners advance to the final international competition held every year in Washington, D.C.

Named in honor of H.E. Philip C. Jessup, justice of the International Court of Justice, the Jessup Competition was founded in the spring of 1959 by a group of international law students from Harvard University, Columbia University and the University of Virginia.

This year, the competition was structured in a way that pitted one team of student lawyers representing the fictitious Republic of Appollonia against another team representing the fictitious Kingdom of Raglan, an archipelago lying about 700 kilometers off the Appollonian coast.

The dispute, which Appollonia and Raglan have taken to the International Court of Justice for settlement, arises from a hypothetical incident involving the Appollonian-flagged cargo ship, the Mairi Maru. The Mairi Maru, carrying a cargo of toxic nuclear waste, was seized by supposed pirates as it was passing through the Raglan archipelago. The pirates stole the ship's navigation and communication equipment and its safe, disabled its steering system and abandoned it to a storm. The storm drove the disabled ship onto uninhabited sandbars, unclaimed by any nation, southeast of the Raglan archipelago, where the ship began to leak toxic waste. The sandbars, famous for sport fishing, generated significant tourist income for the Raglans. The hypothetical case involves issues of responsibility for piracy, nuclear transport, and whether consent is required for a ship to enter another country's territorial waters with a potentially hazardous nuclear cargo.

A team of Uruguayan law students sponsored by the U.S. Embassy in Montevideo participated in this year's competition receiving some of the highest scores. The winner of the 2005 Shearman & Sterling Jessup Cup was the University of Queensland (Australia), however the four-student team from the University of Montevideo comprised of Ady Beitler, Isabel Laventure, Maria Brugnini and Bernardo Amorin del Campo broke every competition record for first time entries by winning awards for second best oralist (Ady Beitler) among the 327 oralists competing, sixth best memorials among the 108 submitted, and three out of four preliminary rounds. "The Uruguay team was the talk of the competition", commented their coach David Aronofsky from the University of Montana.

For more information and rankings, please visit the ILSA website: www.ilsa.org/jessup/jessup05/results.shtml

 

 

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