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Hispanic Population in the U.S. Passes 40 Million, Census Bureau Reports

Hispanic growth rate was more than three times that of the total population

Posted: June 13, 2005 > Detailed tables  

The nation’s Hispanic population reached 41.3 million as of July 1, 2004, according to national estimates by race*, Hispanic origin and age released on June 9, 2005, by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Hispanics, who may be of any race, accounted for about one-half of the national population growth of 2.9 million between July 1, 2003, and July 1, 2004. The Hispanic growth rate of 3.6 percent over the 12-month period was more than three times that of the total population (1.0 percent).

The Census Bureau estimates the number of Asians in the United States at 14.0 million, up 3.4 percent. (Unless otherwise specified, the data refer to the population who reported a race alone or in combination with one or more other races. The tables show data for both this group and those who reported a single race only.)

Following Asians in rate of growth were native Hawaiians and other Pacific islanders (1.7 percent, to 980,000), blacks (1.3 percent, to 39.2 million), American Indians and Alaska natives (1.0 percent, to 4.4 million) and whites (0.8 percent, to 239.9 million). The population of non-Hispanic whites who indicated no other race increased 0.3 percent, to 197.8 million.

The total number of preschoolers (under age 5) in the United States in 2004 was estimated at 20.1 million. Nationally, 7 percent of the population was under age 5. By race and Hispanic origin, this proportion ranged from almost 11 percent for Hispanics to 6 percent for single-race non-Hispanic whites and for American Indians and Alaska natives.

Meanwhile, the number of elementary school-age (5 through 13) children in the nation totaled 36.4 million. Nationwide, 12 percent were in this age group, with the corresponding proportion ranging from 17 percent for native Hawaiians and other Pacific islanders and Hispanics to 11 percent for single-race non-Hispanic whites.

There were 16.8 million high school-age (14 through 17) children. Children in this age group comprised 6 percent of the total population. The proportion of people in this age group ranged from almost 8 percent of American Indians and Alaska natives and native Hawaiians and other Pacific islanders to 5 percent of single-race non-Hispanic whites.

Other highlights:

Working-age adults (18- to 64-year-olds) totaled 184.0 million. Nationally, 63 percent were in this age range. The proportion who were members of this age group ranged from 66 percent for Asians to 61 percent for blacks and Hispanics.

There were 36.3 million people age 65 and over. Nationally, 12 percent of the total population was 65 years and over, with the corresponding proportion ranging from 15 percent for single-race non-Hispanic whites to 5 percent for Hispanics.


A total of 4.9 million people were in the “oldest old” category (age 85 and over). Almost 2 percent of the total population was a member of this age group, ranging from slightly more than 2 percent of non-Hispanic whites reporting only one race to about one-half of 1 percent of Hispanics.

 

* The federal government treats Hispanic origin and race as separate and distinct concepts. In surveys and censuses, separate questions are asked on Hispanic origin and race. The question on Hispanic origin asks respondents if they are Spanish, Hispanic or Latino. Starting with Census 2000, the question on race asks respondents to report the race or races they consider themselves to be. Thus, Hispanics may be of any race. (See U.S. Census Bureau Guidance on the Presentation and Comparison of Race and Hispanic Origin Data.)

These data are based on estimates of U.S. population for July 1, 2004. The Census Bureau estimates population change from the most recent decennial census (Census 2000) using annual data on births, deaths and international migration. More detailed information on the methodology used to produce these estimates can be found at http://www.census.gov/popest/topics/methodology/v2004_nat_char_meth.html.


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